Inna Ganschow

Inna Ganschow

Visiting researcher

research interests
Contemporary history of Luxembourg
Inna joined the C²DH as visiting researcher

Inna Ganschow studied Journalism at Al-Farabi-University as well as Slavonic Studies and Media Science at University of Trier where she obtained her doctorate with a thesis on Media and Bhudism in post-modern Russian literature. From 2008 to 2014, she taught Russian language, literature and media at University of Trier and from 2014-2016 and the University of Saarland.

Inna’s first exposure to television journalism was in her youth when she worked as moderator for the television programme „Bajkonur“ in Kazakhstan. She has been working as a free-lance reporter for ZDF in Germany since 1999, primarily covering historical documentaries and contemporary history under the supervision of Guido Knopp, for which she researches archives and frequently interviews historical witnesses, e.g., ‘Stalingrad: The Great Escape’, ‘The Most Heated Moments during the Cold War’ and ‘Russia’s First Ladies: Imprisoned in the Kremlin’. In terms of print medium, Inna wrote for the local newspaper in Trier ‘Trierischen Volksfreund’ from 1997 to 2004, and has been employed as a Correspondent for the local newspaper in Luxembourg ‘Luxemburger Wort’ for historical, cultural and intercultural themes since 2015. She is also active as an author in Luxembourg. Her current focal point is on the study of Russian presence in Luxembourg in the 20th century.

Her first local publication on this topic was issued in 2014 in Russian. From 2017 to 2019 she will be employed in the Centre for Contemporary History and Digital History (C²DH) at the University of Luxembourg, where she is researching, in the framework OF a project financed by the Lydie-Schmit-Foundation, Russian emigration from 1914 to present. Additionally, Inna is currently conducting a comprehensive archival research endeavour on the forced recruitment of Soviet captives in Luxembourg.

In 2015, she published a Children’s Book of Russian Winter fairy tales in Russian and Luxembourgish.